A Day in the Life of a Respiratory Therapist

Published on Nov 30, 2016

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who have asthma or if you’ve ever had surgery, it’s likely that you’ve seen a respiratory therapist in action. But do you know what a typical day in respiratory care is like? To give you an idea, we spent some time on the job with Bryan, a Respiratory Therapist and graduate of the Carrington Respiratory Care program.

At OMD we have the best of both worlds with Occupational Health and working our shifts as Healthcare Professionals. We would LOVE to video our typical shifts but we cannot due to HIPPA. Please enjoy this video as to get an idea to what we do in an average shift.

Flu Symptoms & Complications

Influenza Symptoms

Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

* It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

Flu Complications

Most people who get influenza will recover in several days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications as a result of the flu. A wide range of complications can be caused by influenza virus infection of the upper respiratory tract (nasal passages, throat) and lower respiratory tract (lungs). While anyone can get sick with flu and become severely ill, some people are more likely to experience severe flu illness. Young children, adults aged 65 years and older, pregnant women, and people with certain chronic medical conditions are among those groups of people who are at high risk of serious flu complications, possibly requiring hospitalization and sometimes resulting in death. For example, people with chronic lung disease are at higher risk of developing severe pneumonia.

Top 10 Most Frequently OSHA Cited Standards

For Fiscal 2015 (Oct. 1, 2014, to Sept. 30, 2015)

The following is a list of the top 10 most frequently cited standards* following inspections of worksites by federal OSHA. OSHA publishes this list to alert employers about these commonly cited standards so they can take steps to find and fix recognized hazards addressed in these and other standards before OSHA shows up. Far too many preventable injuries and illnesses occur in the workplace.

OSHA’s 2015 TOP TEN
Most Frequently Cited Violations

1. 1926.501 – Fall Protection (C)
2. 1910.1200 – Hazard Communication
3. 1926.451 – Scaffolding (C)
4. 1910.134 – Respiratory Protection
5. 1910.147 – Lockout/Tagout

(C) = Construction standard

6. 1910.178 – Powered Industrial Trucks
7. 1926.1053 – Ladders (C)
8. 1910.305 – Electrical, Wiring Methods
9. 1910.212 – Machine Guarding
10. 1910.303 – Electrical, General Requirements